February Meetup – REST in practice (Wed, 26th Feb)

Note: I wasn’t able to book the Central Hotel for our normal date or day of the week, so this talk will be on Wednesday, 26th February.

Just the one talk this month, but it’s a good one – we have Ian Brennan, an Application Architect from ezetop, coming in to talk to us about REST in practice:

I’ll contrast REST design with RPC based design, make a case for using REST principles to design APIs as hyperlinked documents, show HAL as an implementation pattern for REST, and review how ezetop has applied HAL and REST principles to help build out our enterprise architecture.

I’ll also touch on some of the challenges we have faced (and still face) with this approach.

Sounds like a great from the trenches talk. Big thanks to Ian for volunteering.

Don’t forget to check out the links in the sidebar of the blob if you’d like to give a talk, or if you’d like to suggest a topic for a talk. Check out the links to cast your votes also.

When & Where

The talk will be on Wednesday, February 26th in the usual location: the Central Hotel on Exchequer St. at 6.30.

Please take a moment to register with EventBrite here if you are planning on coming – the event is free as always thanks to our sponsors Wonga, but it helps me know the numbers for the room.

See you there,

Andrew

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January Meetup: Building JS apps, AutoFixture and Azure Insights

Got a nice mix of talks to start us off for the new year. And btw there are some new links on the blog site if you’d like to offer to give a talk, or if you’d like to suggest a topic for a talk. Check out the links to cast your votes also.

First up for January is myself, for a change, giving an introduction to building Javascript apps:

Many developers are familiar with adding a few lines of Javascript onto a page to enable some Ajax calls or jQuery effects. But when it comes to building a ‘thick client’ web application, where most of the code is written in Javascript, it can be hard to know where to start. How should you structure your code? What tools do you use to build the app? In this talk, I’ll be sharing my recent experiences in learning how to do just that and will introduce some tools to help such as require.js, npm, bower and grunt.

Bio: Andrew Smith is a software developer with over 10 years experience. C# developer mainly but likes to dabble in other languages. Has helped to run the Dublin Alt.net group for the last few years. Currently enjoying a spell focusing on frontend tech again.

We’ll need some .Net after that!:
Ruben will do a quick tour of coding with AutoFixture, which is a framework for cleaning and clarifying the Arrange phase of your .NET tests.
Bio: A regular attendee at our meetups, Ruben has worked on a wide variety of .NET based systems across domains from trading, to healthcare, app builders and licensing over the last 10 years. Yet repressed memories of that nice simple C++ code from the mid 90s still remain. Works for InishTech on a cloud-based licensing platform.

And finally, we have Niall Moran from Microsoft who has kindly offered to come in to have a chat about Azure:
Niall Moran is a technical evangelist with Microsoft Ireland and will discuss how Azure has evolved from a .NET platform as a service offering to a complete cloud platform to run any workload. Niall will also give some insight into how he sees the platform evolving over the next year.

 

I know Niall is keen to get feedback from the community, so should be a good discussion.

When & Where

The talk will be on Thursday, January 23rd at the usual time and location: the Central Hotel on Exchequer St. at 6.30.

Please take a moment to register with EventBrite here if you are planning on coming – the event is free as always thanks to our sponsors Wonga, but it helps me know the numbers for the room.

See you there,

Andrew

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November Meetup – Temporal correlation and CEP with Event Store Projections

Got a great line up for Dublin Alt.net this November.

First up we have Andrea Magnorsky giving us an Introduction to Game Development:

What are the essential working parts of a game? Different game architectures, a conversation on some of the interesting parts of developing games in C#

Bio: Andrea Magnorsky is a professional software developer and has accrued many years of experience building solid applications. She has been consuming new technologies and frameworks daily for the last 10 years in a never-ending quest for knowledge and a happy developer path.For the last two years she has been developing games and the proud co-founder of BatCat Games. Andrea is involved in the organisation of Global GameCraft, Alt Net in Dublin and other code related communities in Ireland.

 

Then we have James Nugent who is a developer on Greg Young’s EventStore project, coming over from the UK to give us a new talk on Temporal correlation and CEP with Event Store Projections:

Ever tried building a system to do complex event processing but ended up getting bogged down in all the infrastructure necessary? Or maybe you’ve tried running temporal correlation queries from a SQL database and become very familiar with nested subqueries… In this talk we’ll look at the projections model in the Event Store, and how it can be used both for CEP without the fuss, and as a better way of approaching temporal queries, using only Javascript!

Bio: James is a software developer from Bath, England. He works mostly on healthcare systems, travels a lot and is a connoisseur of cider and old guitars.

 

Both talks sound great. Really looking forward to them

Btw November’s meetup will most likely be the last of the year, so hope to see everyone there!

When & Where

The talk will be on Thursday, November 21st at the usual time and location: the Central Hotel on Exchequer St. at 6.30.

Please take a moment to register with EventBrite if you are planning on coming – the event is free as always thanks to our sponsors Wonga, but it helps me know the numbers for the room.

See you there,

Andrew

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Review of Learning NServiceBus

Thanks again to Mike Synnott who gave us the following review at out last meetup

A review of Learning NServiceBus by David Boike.
or
“How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bus”

Technical books with ‘learning’ in the title worry me. I approach them with trepidation, and I’ll tell you why: Many of them turn out to be little more than regurgitations of the subject’s technical documentation with shallow code examples – from which I generally infer that the author didn’t have a good handle on the subject matter.

I’m very glad to say that Learning NServiceBus, (David Boike; PACKT Publishing, 2013, 121 pages; ISBN: 978-1-78216-634-4), is not one of these worrisome reference books. It is clear that Mr Boike has a very good handle on NServiceBus from a developer’s point of view and like NServiceBus itself, this book is guaranteed to deliver its message.

At the opening of chapter one, Getting On The IBus, David hits us with a one-liner describing what NServiceBus is. Then, acknowledging that such trite explanations are, well … trite, he addresses the far trickier problem of explaining what NServiceBus does by presenting several common serviceorientated pitfalls that may resonate with the reader. This is a clever strategy and guaranteed to draw you in because every architect or developer working at the service-interoperability level has encountered at least one of these challenges. (Reading these pitfalls, it was nice to be reminded why NServiceBus is one of my go-to technologies when architecting scalable, durable systems; and how difficult life would be without it.)

David then establishes a contract with the reader that by the end of the book, one will be able to leverage NServiceBus to address these pitfalls and build out enterprise class systems.

And he makes good on this contract. He does it by starting with a slow prescriptive pace, gradually introducing more detail as the reader comes up to speed.

Right off the bat, David shows us how to prepare our machine for NServiceBus v4.0, how to install it and how to build our first NServiceBus solution. And, by Jingo, does he make it look easy! In fact, the step-by-step tutorial in Chapter One is so methodical that with only a basic knowledge of Visual Studio and NuGet, you’d still have your first NServiceBus project built and running within 10 minutes of cracking the cover; complete with a message assembly, a service endpoint, a message handler, and an MVC application. This is how every tutorial book should open.

In chapter two, Messaging Patterns, David kicks it up a gear. Gone is the systematic handholding and we are fast-tracked into a treatise on the usage of Commands versus Events, a discussion on that great anathema to the ACID rule, Eventual Consistency, and an explanation of NServiceBus’s Publish/Subscribe mechanism.

By the end of chapter three we know how NServiceBus deals with message delivery failures, and a chapter after that we’ve learned about hosting the NServiceBus process, using it with IoC containers and its support for various message transports. By the time we close the back cover we have learned about Sagas – NServiceBus’s long-running processes, how to open the hood on NServiceBus and rewire it to provide all those highly-specialised behaviours that crop up in every large project, how NServiceBus handles encryption and how to administer NServiceBus in the wild.

For a tutorial, the cadence of this book is damn-near perfect. David Boike crams an incredible amount of information into 121 pages and does it in a way that is easy to absorb. The code examples are targeted perfectly and are available as downloads from the Packt website.

If you want to learn NServiceBus, buy this book. If your team already uses NServiceBus, buy this book: As new guys come through the door, set them loose on chapter one and the experienced NServiceBus developers can use the later chapters as an aide-memoire or a quick reference. I’m already supposed to know NServiceBus back-to-front and this book taught me some new things and crystallised some advanced topics that I was a bit sketchy on.
I wish I’d written this book. If I had, I’d consider it a job very well done.

 

Mike Synnott is a 30-year veteran of the software development industry. He is currently a team lead and senior developer with Kobo in Dublin, where he uses a variety of .NET technologies, including
NServiceBus to architect durable and highavailability solutions for Kobo’s online eBook and eMagazine store. He is also a published writer having written technical articles for .EXE Magazine in London in the early 90s and more recently having published the first of a series of sci-fi/fantasy novels set in contemporary Ireland. He lives in Ashford, Co Wicklow with his wife and their cat overlord. He can be reached at mike@synnott.me

David Boike is a Principal Consultant with ILM Professional Services with more than a decade of development experience in ASP.NET and related technologies and has been an avid proponent of NServiceBus since Version 2.0 in 2010. He is also an alumnus of Udi Dahan’s Advanced Distributed Systems Design course. David resides in the Twin Cities with his wife and daughter. He can be found on Twitter at @DavidBoike and on his blog at http://www.make-awesome.com.

 

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October Meetup – NServiceBus Book Review & giveaway and Testing C# with F#

This month we have two speakers who kindly stepped in at short notice, so big thanks to both.

First up we have Mike Synnott reviewing the new “Learning NServiceBus” book. We’ll have a little quiz after and will be giving away copies of the book.

Mike Synnott is a 30-year veteran of the software development industry. He is currently a team lead and senior developer with Kobo in Dublin, where he uses a variety of .NET technologies, including NServiceBus to architect durable and highavailability solutions for Kobo’s online eBook and eMagazine store.

Then we have Ruben Bartelink talking about testing using F#:

In this talk, Ruben will walk through the whys and hows of using F# and some projects originating in the F# community to build and maintain a clean set of Living Documentation and Tests for any .NET application.

A regular attendee at our meetups, Ruben has worked on a wide variety of .NET based systems across domains from trading, to healthcare, app builders and licensing over the last 10 years. Yet repressed memories of that nice simple C++ code from the mid 90s still remain. Works for InishTech on a cloud-based licensing platform.

When & Where

The talk will be on Thursday, October 24th in the regular spot: the Central Hotel on Exchequer St. at 6.30.

It’s a free event as always thanks to our sponsors Wonga but please sign up to the EventBrite event so I know the numbers for the room.

See you there,

Andrew

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September Meetup – SignalR

We’re doing a deep dive into SignalR for our September meetup with 2 talks by community members Dorin Manoli and Slawomir Dorzak

ASP.NET SignalR is a library for ASP.NET developers that simplifies the process of adding real-time web functionality to applications. It can be used to add real-time web functionality including multiplayer games.

Dorin will be talking about how SignalR is implemented:

  • What techniques are used to create the real time communication
  • What client and servers are supported by SignalR
  • Walkthrough of the Hubs API
  • A short demo

Dorin Manoli is an independent software developer in Web and .Net space

Slawomir will cover:

  • Authentication and Authorization
  • Scaling out
  • Some gotchas
  • Calling JavaScript functions from C#
  • Alternatives to SignalR
  • Scale out demo

Slawomir Dorzak has almost 10 years of experience in software development. He is programming mainly in C#, recently also in Java and Go. Currently working for Dell as part of Dell Multi Cloud Manager Team (formerly Enstratius).

Looking forward to it!

When & Where

The talk will be on Thursday, September 19th in the regular spot: the Central Hotel on Exchequer St. at 6.30.

It’s a free event as always thanks to our sponsors Wonga but please sign up to the EventBrite event so I know the numbers for the room.

See you there,

Andrew

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July Meetup – NServiceBus 4 and intro to NancyFX

Update: Sean has started a blog series covering Service Matrix and Service Insight in more detail - http://www.seanfarmar.com/?p=8

And… we’re back. Sorry for not getting anything organised for June. To make up for it, we’ll have 2 talks in July :)

First up, Sean Farmar will give us a walkthrough of the new features in NServiceBus 4:

NServiceBus 4.0 has many new features and tools, we will go through them and demo as much as we can in the time we have.

Bio: Sean Farmar is an independent consultant in the SOA and NServiceBus space.

Next up, Damian Hickey will be giving us an intro to the Nancy web framework:

Nancy is a lightweight, low-ceremony, framework for building HTTP based services on .Net and Mono. The goal of the framework is to stay out of the way as much as possible and provide a super-duper-happy-path to all interactions. It simplifies the programming model by allowing the developer to define functions based on a URL route which in contrast to MVC where you define controllers and actions. It powers jabbr.net, the show case application for ASP.NET’s SignalR.

Bio: Damian is a software developer, a CTO at a small financial software company and a regular at Dublin Alt.Net. He maintains and contributes to various open source projects including NEventStore, RavenDB and is an adviser to Microsoft’s Katana Project.

Two really good topics. Should be a great evening.

When & Where

The talk will be on Thursday, July 18th in the regular spot: the Central Hotel on Exchequer St. at 6.30.

It’s a free event as always thanks to our sponsors Wonga but please sign up to the EventBrite event so I know the numbers for the room.

See you there

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May Meetup – Platform as a Service options for .Net

This month Slawomir Dorzak has kindly volunteered to give us a talk on Platform as a Service options for .Net:

Platform as a Service is a new hot thing and is revolutionizing the way we write and manage our applications. PaaS lets us focus on what’s important – that is creating and running the application by taking care of the infrastructure. By far the most popular PaaS platform for .NET is Microsoft Windows Azure, but is that it or maybe there are others? In this session we’ll look at some of the benefits and challenges that come with using PaaS. We will also explore some alternatives to Windows Azure that can be used for hosting .NET applications.

Bio: Slawomir Dorzak has almost 10 years of experience in software development. He is programming mainly in C# .NET, recently also in Ruby and Go. Last two years working for Dell Cloud teams he has been focused on open source cloud computing systems as well as cloud oriented application architecture.

When & Where

The talk will be on Thursday, May 30th in the regular spot: the Central Hotel on Exchequer St. at 6.30.

It’s a free event as always thanks to our sponsors Wonga but please sign up to the EventBrite event so I know the numbers for the room.

See you there

 

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April Meetup – Developing OWIN compliant web applications with Katana

This month we have ALT.Net regular Damian Hickey giving us a talk on developing OWIN compliant web applications with Katana:

Open Web Interface for .NET, or OWIN for short, defines a standard interface between .NET web servers and web applications. The goal of the OWIN interface is to decouple server and application, encourage the development of simple modules for .NET web development, and, by being an open standard, stimulate the open source ecosystem of .NET web development tools.

The Katana Project is Microsoft’s effort, guided by the members of the OSS community, to create a suite of hosts, libraries and tools to compose, host and test OWIN compliant frameworks and applications.

This session will cover the reasons why the OWIN specification came to be, what problems it solves and how you can use it with Katana packages to create (and test!) OWIN compliant applications.

When & Where

Finally back to our usual date of the third Thursday of the month, the talk will be on Thursday, April 18th, in the regular spot: the Central Hotel on Exchequer St. at 6.30.

It’s a free event as always thanks to our sponsors Wonga but please sign up to the EventBrite event so I know the numbers for the room.

See you there

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March meetup: Agile software architecture sketches – NoUML!

[Heads up: This talk is on Thursday, 14th March]

[Update: Due to the bad weather, we've had to reschedule to Thursday, 28th March]

Hot on the heels of our last talk, we’re ready for our next meetup. We’re lucky to have author and noted speaker Simon Brown in Dublin this March and he’s kindly offered to give us a talk  on Agile software architecture sketches:

Agility is about moving fast and this requires good communication. A consistent, shared vision is essential in order for teams to push in the same direction, but it’s surprising that many agile teams struggle to effectively communicate the architecture of the software they are building. As an industry we do have the Unified Modeling Language (UML), yet many people favour informal “boxes and lines” sketches instead. The problem is that such diagrams rarely make any sense, usually need a narrative to accompany them and ultimately slow the team down. Although we can argue whether UML offers an effective way to communicate software architecture, that’s often irrelevant because many teams have already thrown out UML or simply don’t know it. Abandoning UML is one thing but, in the race for agility, many software development teams have lost the ability to communicate visually.

This session is aimed at everybody involved in the software development process and is about improving architectural communication in an agile environment. You’ll see some patterns and anti-patterns related to NoUML diagrams and you’ll learn some simple techniques for communicating software architecture using informal sketches.

About Simon:

Simon lives in Jersey (Channel Islands) and works as an independent consultant, specialising in software architecture, technical leadership and the balance with agility. Simon regularly speaks at international software development conferences and provides consulting/training to software teams at organisations across Europe, ranging from small startups through to global blue chip companies. He is the founder of Coding the Architecture (a website about pragmatic, hands-on software architecture) and the author of Software Architecture for Developers (an e-book that is being published incrementally through Leanpub). He still likes to write code too, primarily in .NET and Java. Simon can be found on Twitter at @simonbrown.

Simon was only available on the 14th, so hope you don’t mind I’m shifting the date a bit again to accommodate (last month’s was later than normal – which is why there’s such a short gap this time). Normal service resuming shortly. Update: Simon got snowed in with the bad weather, so new date is the 28th

When & Where

The talk will be on Thursday, March 28th, in the usual location: the Central Hotel on Exchequer St. at 6.30.

It’s a free event as always thanks to our sponsors Wonga but please sign up to the EventBrite event so I know the numbers for the room.

See you there!

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